Max Kowalski : 6 Japanischer Frühling (6/10) Op.19
Suzi More & Angela Manso

13. Juli 2012
1. Gleichesehnsucht 1:32
2. Blutenschnee 1:30
3. Frühlings Ende 1:26
4. Andenschnee 1:32
5. Sehnsucht Der Nachtigall 1:10
6. Schnee in Fruhling 1:31

Album Notes

Max Kowalski(1882-1956) was born in Kowal, Poland. His family moved the next year to Frankfort, Germany, where he grew up, studied and earned Doctorates in both Music and Law (his specialty was Copyrights). His teacher of compostition was Bernhard Sekles and voice, Alexander Heineman. In Germany from 1913 till 1931, Max Kowalski was a prolific composer of beautiful lieder in the Romantic style. Although he was Jewish, Max Kowalski wrote music of all styles and genres, from Japanese, Chinese, Danish, Arabic, French and that of many great German authors,he even wrote a Marienlieder in his Opus 12. He was friend to many other composers, artists and performers and every song cycle he wrote was quickly published until Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich took over the country. In the late 30's Kowalski was very involved with the "Kulterbund" in Frankfort, Germany and his music continued to have popularity in their orchestral concerts. He is mentioned and highlighted by his presence at the last Kulturbund concert(1938) in Martin Goldsmith's book entitled "The Inextinguishable Symphony". By the end of 1938, Kowalski was arrested and spent time in Buchenwald but within a month he was released and he fled to England where he spent the rest of his life teaching voice, singing in a Synagogue and making a humble living. Although no music of his was ever published again, he kept writing new works, 17 new song cycles in manuscripts which singers performed in concerts and on radio. Opus 1 is his first composition dated 1913 and first published by Leukart in Germany. It had been out-of-print many years until Dr. Walter Foster of Recital Publications in Huntsville, Texas took up the committment to bring as many of Max Kowalski's song cycles to the public as possible. So far, 11 of his 17 previously published cycles have been reprinted. As well as one cycle from the manuscripts, Opus 18, Sieben Gedichte von Hafiz (1933)

A New Jersey native, Miss More has performed extensively throughout the United States and abroad. She has been soloist and has appeared in numerous operatic roles performing with the Festival Chorus of New Jersey, the Masterwork Chorus and Orchestra, Orpheus Chamber Singers, the Plainfield Symphony, Ars Musica Antiqua, the Garden State Chorale, the State Repertory Opera, Jersey Lyric Opera, Choral Baccarelli (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Academy of Vocal Arts Opera Theatre (Philadelphia, PA), Montclair Chamber Orchestra, and numerous others. In 1989, she was the award-winning collaborator along with composer Loretta Jankowski, of a song cycle entitled Phoenix, published internationally by Boosey & Hawkes, in December 1993. The work, featuring Ms. More, was presented at both the Los Angeles, California (1989), and Little Rock, Arkansas, national Association of Teacher's of singing (NATS) conventions. She is a recipient of several Lila Wallace/Reader's Digest Incentive Grants, for performance and research. She is a member of the NATS, NJ, NYC and National chapters. Also, a composer of jazz, folk and children's songs. Her voice teachers and coaches include Franco Rossi-Roudett, Terrence Shook, Helen Fenstermacher, Chloe Owens, Daniel Ferro, Marlena Malas, Dorothea Discala, Frank Valentino, Deborah Taylor, and Dolores Cassinelli. She has appeared in master classes with Elly Amelling, Jerome Hines, Judith Raskin, and Daltin Baldwin. Ms. Morehead holds a B.A. degree from Rutgers University, M.A. degree from Jersey City State College, and pursued studies at the Academy of Vocal Arts, in Philadelphia, and New York University.

She has worked as voice teacher, chorus director and Orff specialist at the Newark School of the Arts for over 27 years. As well as has taught over twenty years in the New Jersey school systems, now retired.

Pianist Angela Manso has served as musical/director/pianist for over forty operas and musical theater productions, including twenty for New York City's Bel Canto Opera Company. She served as assistant conductor for the Carnegie Hall performance of Mrs. H.H.A. Beach's Grand Mass in E-Flat Major, a work that was subsequently recorded in the Newport Classics label. Ms. Manso was the official accompanist for the first World Harmonica Championship on the Isle of Jersey, U.K., during which she performed in recital with harmonica virtuoso, Cham-Ber Huang, and accompanied internationally renowned artist Larry Adler and Mr. Huang performing the Bach Double Violin Concerto arranged for two harmonicas. As a composer, her Prayer for Mankind was performed by the Central City Chorus with Director Mr. Charles Pilling and organist Harry Huff. Women Singing, a women's choir directed by Ms. Phyllis Clark, performed Ms. Manso's O Son of Spirit! (originally written for eight-part mixed choir and arranged for four-part women's voices by Ms. Clark for the concert). The Celestial Tree was performed by Monica Jalili, soprano, and Angela Manso, pianist, at the Festival of the Arts presented by Global Music in New York City in 2002. Ms. Manso's chamber piece, Dawn, written for women's voices, harp, Native American flute, and Tibetan bells and ting-shas, was presented at the New York Baha'i convention in 2001.
Final Mastering and Artwork by Max Caselnova at Clearcut Studios, Garfield, NJ.